How Working Parents Can Manage the Demands of School-Age Kids

For working parents with school-age children, this time of year is especially chaotic. The season brings end-of-the-school-year projects, state testing, report cards, parent-teacher conferences, the transition to 10 long weeks of child care arrangements, the awkwardness of explaining to colleagues why you’re out of the office again, the need to follow up with the pediatrician about health forms for September (they’re overdue already), and the worry about whether your child will do better in math next year with a different teacher.

Your task list is endless, your stress level high. And a lot of the work and worry seems to be coming from one place: your child’s school.

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Daisy Dowling
How to Work From Home When You Have Kids

Finally: You’ve got the chance to work remotely. Maybe it’s due to the structure of your new job, or organization; maybe it’s part of that new corporate work/life initiative; or maybe it’s the result of months of lobbying the higher-ups. Regardless, you’ve won the prize that many — or most — working parents dream of. No commute, no office distractions, no one looking disapprovingly at you when you duck out of the office for a pediatrician’s appointment. Just you, a comfortable home office, and the opportunity to spend more time with your kids.

Now comes the hard part.

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Daisy Dowling
How to Handle Work When Your Child Is Sick

“Mommy/Daddy, I don’t feel so good.”

It’s a phrase that, along with its nonverbal equivalent – that glazed, pale, listless look that your kids get when they’re coming down with something — that you’ve learned to dread. Because whatever the ailment, be it flu, stomach bug, sprain, or other, two things are now certain...

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Daisy Dowling
7 Simple Ways Working Parents Can Simultaneously Improve Their Careers, Their Families, and Themselves

There are three things that all working parents have in common: (1) a lack of time; (2) a feeling that we should be spending more time — at work, with our kids, at the gym, or engaged in any number of important activities that get squeezed when we have too much to do; and (3) an uneasy, guilty, powerless, nagging feeling about all of it.

There’s a better way.

We can’t add hours to the day or shrink our to-do lists — but we can pick our spots. We can choose to do the things that powerfully and positively impact our careers, home lives and well-being in very little time.

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Daisy Dowling
When You’re Leaving Your Job Because of Your Kids

You’ve decided to leave the organization, and the decision was driven by your needs as a working parent. Maybe you’re taking a new job with fewer hours or less travel so you can spend more time with the kids; maybe you’re “up-ramping” and taking on a position with more responsibility, pressure, and pay – so you can afford those looming college bills; or maybe you’ve decided to put your focus on responsibilities at home before looking for a different opportunity.

Regardless of the specific reason why, the question now is how – how to leave in the right way, how to be credible, honest and transparent while acting in your own best interests, and how to preserve the long-term career capital you’ve worked so hard to create.

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Daisy Dowling
Balancing Parenting and Work Stress: A Guide

Most working parents look to their networks of mentors, coworkers, and professional contacts for advice on balancing the competing demands of work and home. But the off-the-cuff guidance that most new working parents in the U.S. get, even if it’s candid and well-intentioned, isn’t always helpful. Too often it’s contradictory, vague, out of date, unactionable, even downright disheartening. With so many professional fathers and mothers depending on this common wisdom, it’s no wonder workforce opt-out rates aren’t budging and so many working parents report feeling exhausted and overwhelmed. Although it’s a go-to resource, the working-parent grapevine doesn’t always provide the most useful or can-do support.

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Daisy Dowling